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Dvořák: Cello Concerto - Wispelwey, Fischer

Dvořák: Cello Concerto - Wispelwey, Fischer

Channel Classics  CCS SA 25807

Stereo/Multichannel Hybrid

Classical - Orchestral


Dvořák: Cello Concerto, Symphonic Variations

Pieter Wispelwey (cello)
Budapest Festival Orchestra
Ivan Fischer (conductor)

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Review by John Broggio - February 4, 2009

In the concerto, the Budapest Festival Orchestra under Ivan Fischer play like gods and accompany with a passion and sensitivity that is not often heard in this work. Wispelwey's playing of the solo part is perhaps a bit too interventionist for some tastes; few bars escape a point being audibly made. For the majority of the time, this occurs well within the sense of phrasing adopted by Wispelwey and the orchestra yet at times (particularly in the first half of the opening movement), there is a little too much point and not quite enough music making. In the second and third movements both Fischer and Wispelwey are more clearly reading from the same score and the music making sounds much more relaxed and natural and at this point the interpretation opens up into soulful singing from all concerned. The audience is impressively quiet - it is not until the concluding applause (not tracked separately) that one listening "blind" would realise the provenance of concert performances.

In the Symphonic Variations there are no doubts as to the quality of the playing or phrasing. Here, Fischer and his orchestra are simply peerless. In a glowing orchestral palette of sound, Fischer points the details whilst at the same time giving a coherence to the work as a whole - the ear is constantly intrigued and the mind firmly engaged; something that cannot always be said for rival accounts of this work. Again, there is a round of richly deserved applause at the works conclusion (not tracked separately) although it must be said that the audience are more restless here.

The sound is some of Channel Classics' finest, opening out into a glorious melange of sound that is admirably clear at the same time.

Recommended in particular for the Symphonic Variations.

Copyright © 2009 John Broggio and HRAudio.net

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Sonics (Multichannel):

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